(2014) Conservative Party -M.P.’s Paedo Half-brother -JAILED FOR 13 YEARS FOR 100s OF SEX ASSAULTS AGAINST KIDS

 

 

 

Former teacher: Charles Napier, 67, conducted a ‘campaign of abuse’ at the school where he worked

  • Charles Napier conducted ‘abuse campaign’ at school where he worked
  • 67-year-old groomed and assaulting 21 victims aged as young as eight
  • Napier, of Dorset, earned nickname ‘rapier Napier’ at school, court hears
  • He said when interviewed that he felt ‘ghastly’ and ‘desperately sorry’
  • Napier is half-brother of Conservative MP for Maldon, John Whittingdale

The half-brother of a senior Conservative MP was today jailed for 13 years for carrying out hundreds of sexual assaults on young boys.

Former teacher Charles Napier, 67, who is related to Maldon MP John Whittingdale, conducted a ‘campaign of abuse’ at the school where he worked in the late 1960s and early 1970s, grooming and assaulting 21 victims aged as young as eight on scores of occasions.

Last month he pleaded guilty to 28 counts of indecent assault – including many covering ‘multiple incidents’ – and one indecency charge in relation to those crimes.

Today he admitted a further two separate historic allegations of indecent assault against two 13-year-old boys after he left the school, the first in 1979 and the second in 1983.

Napier stared straight ahead and betrayed no emotion as Judge Nicholas Loraine-Smith sentenced him at Southwark Crown Court in London.

Napier joined the school, which cannot be named, after leaving university and when he was arrested last year he told police he already knew he was a paedophile at that time.

The judge said: ‘I have no doubt that … you sought that post because of the proximity you would have to boys.

‘Within a very short time you were grooming those you had chosen, using the techniques of charm, flattery and the abuse of your power. The number of indecent assaults must be into the hundreds.’

The judge said some of the victims’ lives had been ‘dramatically damaged’.

He added: ‘These offences…were committed by someone who had a special duty of care and who gravely abused that duty by grooming them for his own purposes.’

 

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PARASITES: cast-off ministers given golden goodbyes of almost £90,000 including payment to richest MP in Commons

553210_3675287878960_551982437_nTories and Liberal Democrats axed in the reshuffle will receive a total of £88,687 on ‘Money Monday’ in Whitehall.

Taxpayers face forking out almost £90,000 in “golden goodbyes” to reject ministers today.

Tories and Liberal Democrats axed in the recent reshuffle can pocket up to £17,000 apiece tax free on what has been dubbed Money Monday in Whitehall.

Conservative Richard Benyon – the richest MP in the Commons, who stands to inherit £110million – is in line for more than £5,000 of public money.

Officials say that the severance pay is a legal entitlement but Ireland is changing the law to end the cash for cast-offs scheme there as part of austerity measures.

Campaigning MP John Mann said that the UK should follow suit.

Labour’s Mr Mann said: “There is no basis whatsoever for paying this in Britain. We should follow their lead.

“These people are still getting generous MPs’ pay. It is an insult to people struggling across the country that they get a golden handshake.”

All departing ministers are entitled to three months pay if they do not get another job within three weeks.

That means that those dumped in the last reshuffle can claim the cash from today.

Former Cabinet minister Michael Moore is set to pocket £17,042 after he was sacked as Scotland Secretary.

Fellow Lib Dem Jeremy Browne is among five ex-Ministers of State who are in line for £8,086 after being axed.

Conservative Simon Burns can also pocket the huge sum even though he quit to stand unsuccessfully for Deputy Commons Speaker.

Benyon is one of three junior ministers who are entitled to £5,760 each. Three of his fellow Tories get £4,646 after leaving the whips office. Two of them, John Randall and Greg Knight, have also received knighthoods.

In all, taxpayers face paying out £88,687 to ex-ministers.

A Cabinet Office spokesman said: “Severance pay is widely used across both private and public sectors. Ministerial severance pay has been required under legislation since 1991.”

But low tax pressure group the TaxPayers’ Alliance echoed John Mann’s call for the payments to be axed.

Spokesman Jonathan Isaby said: “When money is so tight and David Cameron talks about wanting to reduce the cost of politics, it beggars belief that these golden goodbyes are still being doled out to ex-ministers.

“After all, having left these posts, they will all still get the MPs’ annual salary of more than £66,000.

“MPs taking on a ministerial role know full well that it’s no job for life and ought to be planning their finances accordingly.

“Taxpayers will be especially baffled that even those who resigned of their own accord still get these tax-free payments worth thousands: which of their constituents working in the private sector would get a bumper payday for quitting their job?”

ARTICLE AND AUDIO: The Revd Paul Flowers ticked all the right ‘progressive’ boxes — that’s why he could get away with anything

Sustainability. Tick! Inclusivity. Tick! Fairtrade. Tick! All that mattered to Labour was the Crystal Methodist’s show of liberal piety.

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Yet again, one particular question has formed on lips up and down the land. How in heaven’s name could so many people have failed to spot such a spectacular abuse of a public position?

We heard it first in the Jimmy Savile scandal, when the posthumous discovery of half a century of predation left people incredulous that so many had known about but done nothing to stop his serial depravities. Now a similar question needs to be asked about the Revd Paul Flowers, the disgraced Methodist minister and former chairman of the Co-op Bank who was filmed apparently handing over £300 to buy a stash of cocaine and crystal meth and also boasted of using ketamine, cannabis and a club drug, GHB.

The real scandal, though, is not just that he was a staggeringly incompetent bank chief who knew next to nothing about banking and presided over a bank that somehow fell into a £1.5 billion black hole. It is not even his predilection for cocaine, crystal meth and the occasional ‘two-day, drug-fuelled gay orgy’ (to use his words). The scandal is that no one spotted that he was spectacularly unsuited to the jobs he was given — or if they did, they chose to do nothing about it. Yet again, a public figure with his ethics pinned to his sleeve somehow existed beyond proper scrutiny.

In the frame alongside the deeply un-fragrant Flowers are various institutions which now have questions to answer. The Co-op Bank, which elected him chairman. The Labour party, which banked his donations. Ed Miliband, who dined with him and appointed him to Labour’s financial and industrial advisory board. And the Methodist Church, which appointed him a ‘superintendent’ minister and designated him a trustee for its investment funds and property — even though he had next to no expertise in business.

Oh — and he has also been a member of the Advertising Standards Authority, vice-chairman of the National Association of Citizens’ Advice Bureaux and chairman of Manchester Camerata, the city’s chamber orchestra, not to mention chairman of the drug abuse charity Lifeline and the Terrence Higgins Trust. He is an icon of our time.

So how come none of these bodies ever spotted his spectacular unsuitability to be a member of the Great and the Good?

His striking unfitness to advise anyone on economic matters was demonstrated at the Treasury select committee earlier this month. Asked to state the Co-op Bank’s total assets, he guessed £3 billion; it was actually £47 billion. His performance may well have caused onlookers to scratch their heads and ask themselves: just what exotic substances is he on?

Read on and listen to the audio:  http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/9082571/an-icon-of-our-time/